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POSTED: Apr 29, 2019 | in Business

Raising Your Prices - What You Should Know

Everyone does it....  Your doctor does it. Your dentist does it.  Retailers do it.  But as hairdressers we are always hesitant to raise our prices.  Most of us worry that our clients will go somewhere else.  Or that our clients will protest and complain and make the situation uncomfortable. 

So when SHOULD you raise your prices?  It is recommended that you consider a price increase when your books are solid for at least 2-3 months in advance.  When you have a waitlist its time to think about raising your prices (or moving up a level if your salon has multi-level pricing).  Your prices should go up if you're in demand!

Don't feel bad for charging more. Every year you receive more education and gain experience.  Other jobs have raises and promotions - are you any less deserving?   A good rule of thumb is to raise your prices between 5-10% each year to year and a half.  The exact amount should depend on your demographic. Be confident about your increase and let your clients know that you are worth it!  

Address the pricing issue with grace.  Keep your feelings out of it.  If you are so uncomfortable raising your prices - start with a price increase for new clients then slowly work that increase into your regular clientele.  Give your clients notice, "Today your haircut is $60.  Starting August 1, my haircut price will be $65." It is recommended that you notify your guests at least 6 weeks in advance.  The last thing you want to do is surprise them. 

Yes, a few clients may choose to leave you for a less expensive option; but the ones who stay will make up for that loss because they will be paying more.  You cannot assume a client doesn't have the money to pay for it.  People afford what they want to.  

The most important thing to remember when you are considering a price increase is that the treatment of your guest goes up with your pricing.  You must always create an incredible experience for your client.